Games

New Resident Evil 2 Trailer Shows Off The Mysterious Ada Wong

Game Informer News Feed - Thu, 09/20/2018 - 06:25

Capcom released a new story trailer for Resident Evil 2's remake showing off the femme fatale spy Ada Wong and her new design for the first time. You can check out the trailer below.

The trailer shows the major players of the game, including Claire, Leon, Ada, the Birkins, and overall kind of spoils a decent bit of Resident Evil 2 if you never played it and are hoping to go in fresh.

Resident Evil 2 releases on the PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and PC on January 25.

Categories: Games

New Devil May Cry 5 Trailer Shows Dante, Lady, Trish, And Mega Man's Buster

Game Informer News Feed - Thu, 09/20/2018 - 05:39

Despite earlier releasing an extended Gamescom trailer, Capcom did in fact still release a Tokyo Games Show trailer featuring Dante. The trailer focuses on the old school Devil May Cry crew of Dante, Trish, and Lady primarily, but also brings Nero and Nico in to interact with them.

You can check out the trailer below.

Interesting to note that, despite removing the music video for the song "Subhuman" from the trailer earlier today, the song is still present in the trailer.

The TGS trailer also shows us the first look at V, the third playable character in the game. Contrary to speculation, he does not appear to be Vergil, but he could be associated with him somehow. It seems unlikely Itsuno would call him V without realizing the association people would make with his favorite character.

During their presentation today, Capcom also revealed that Devil May Cry 5 would crossover with Mega Man, as well, giving Nero a Mega Buster Devil Arm. The arm functions as you would expect a Mega Buster to function, including pellet and charge shots. While the trailer for it, which you can find below, takes some creative licenses with the in-game camera, I sure wouldn't mind if they included the exploding energy circles for Nero's death animation.

The Mega Buster was mentioned as part of Devil May Cry 5's Deluxe Edition which, much like Resident Evil 2's remake coming in January, has music tracks from the previous game included as DLC. The Deluxe Edition also includes an enhanced motorcycle weapon for Dante and three other devil breakers for Nero.

Devil May Cry 5 is releasing on PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and PC on March 8.

Categories: Games

The Gardens Between Review - Dance Among The Stars

Gamespot News Feed - Wed, 09/19/2018 - 16:00

A game that can be completed in a single sitting is an opportunity to experience an idea from start to finish without external factors getting in the way. It could be a boss rush that's just a gauntlet of the meanest brutes around, or it could be a touching tale that makes the most of its brief runtime by getting to the heart of the matter. A short-format game risks wrapping up before its time has come, but paced properly, it can be the perfect fit when the right idea comes along. In the case of The Gardens Between, the heartfelt interactions that play out on-screen between two friends on a sentimental adventure make the game the definition of short but sweet.

It begins one dark and stormy night, when as if by magic the two friends are pulled into a strange world while hiding from the rain in their cozy treehouse. They materialize on a planet dominated by water, and the islands they sail between using their treehouse-turned-boat are manifestations of their memories, recreated with real-world objects. Supersized couches and knick-knacks function as structures and obstacles in the imaginary dimension, and sometimes as mechanisms used to solve puzzles. Your goal on each island is to reach the end of a path and deliver an orb of light--a process that solidifies the friends' memories as constellations in the night sky.

Though you can influence each character's actions, you don't directly control their movement. Rather than move them to and fro, you can shift time forward and backwards, and the two characters will walk along a path in kind. They each possess a distinct ability--one can carry a lamp to transport orbs of light, and the other can activate switches that reconfigure puzzle-related elements in the environment.

The environmental puzzles run the gamut from simple cause-and-effect scenarios to unorthodox headscratchers that require the use of dreamlogic. In practically every case the necessary hints are right before your eyes; shifting time to and fro and paying close attention to the way things change is often all you need to deduce a solution. The trick is usually the manipulation of objects that are free from time's grasp in conjunction with finding the right moment in time to let them loose.

Without these puzzles The Gardens Between would struggle to last an hour, yet despite being modestly challenging and inventive, they somehow feel unimportant in the grand scheme. There is no context for their existence as obstacles other than being opportunities for two friends to cooperate, but the tiny doses of narrative at the end of each island reflect the objects in the scene rather than the efforts used to pass through it. Puzzles are the "gameplay" that allows you to play a part in the two characters' journey and in a way make the realization of each memory feel earned, but they fall by the wayside when the spotlight is focused on the two teens.

Though the world they venture through is full of creative touches and small magical moments, the two characters own every moment. From the way they subtly peep at one another while crossing paths, to the adorable gestures they use to point out helpful objects in the distance, their body language clues you in to their special bond. They say so much without ever uttering a word. Their cute and quirky selves are infectiously adorable, and before you know it, you've tumbled head over heels into their world and ultimately the formation of a new, unforgettable memory by the end of their journey.

It may only take two to three hours to see everything The Gardens Between has to offer, but the warm and fuzzy feelings from start to finish ensure that your memories of playing it will live on. The expressive faces of the two teens and the relatable memories they share will speak to anyone who's ever had a close childhood friend, and while the puzzles won't go down as the most ingenious or demanding, they nevertheless give you more time to spend frolicking in a nostalgic and heartwarming world where friendship is all that matters.

Categories: Games

How To Put Your Pokémon Go Collection Into Pokémon Let's Go, Pikachu

Game Informer News Feed - Wed, 09/19/2018 - 15:43

The new trailer for Pokémon Let's Go, Pikachu/Eevee details how you can import Pokémon from mobile title Pokémon Go into the Switch title.

Your Pokémon from Pokémon Go appear in the Go Park Complex (made up of 20 Go Parks), and each Go Park can hold 50 Pokémon. Once they are in a Go Park they must then be caught in order for you to use them in the Switch game. When 25 of the same species of Pokémon are in the complex, you can play the minigame (referenced in the trailer) for Candies to power up your Pokémon.

Friends' Pokémon can also be transferred to a single save file.

Pokémon Let's Go, Pikachu/Eevee comes out on November 16. For more on the title, check out this previous trailer showing the power of partnerships in the game.

Categories: Games

Grip: Combat Racing's Multiplayer Trailer Is High-Speed

Game Informer News Feed - Wed, 09/19/2018 - 14:01

Grip: Combat Racing's developers Caged Element have revealed a multiplayer trailer for their upcoming gravity-defying racing game. 

The multiplayer mode has split-screen multiplayer racing in two-player, three-player, and four-player variations. Local multiplayer can also build tournaments with a ton of malleability to make the kind of tournament you want. Online play allows ten racers to a track and will have online leaderboards.

Grip: Combat Racing releases on November 6 on PlayStation 4, Xbox One, Switch, and PC.

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Game Informer News Feed - Wed, 09/19/2018 - 14:00

Released on PC last year, Home Sweet Home is a horror game uniquely based on Thai lore and mythology that has been floating around YouTuber videos for the last year. Now the game launches on Xbox One and PlayStation 4 on October 9. A separate PlayStation VR version is also available the same day.

You can check out the trailer of the game from its PC release below. Keep in mind, it is a horror title, so don't watch if you're squeamish.

The game is releasing at retail a few days later on October 16 exclusively at GameStop. The retail version is only for PlayStation 4 and includes both the regular game and the PlayStation VR edition.

[Disclaimer: GameStop is the parent company of Game Informer]

Categories: Games

Luffy Meets New Friends And Enemies In New One Piece: World Seeker Story Trailer

Game Informer News Feed - Wed, 09/19/2018 - 02:40

As part of Tokyo Game Show, Bandai Namco has released a new story trailer for One Piece: World Seeker. The newest game to borrow the license is unique in that One Piece creator Eiichiro Oda penned the story about Luffy ending up on Jewel Island near the Navy's prison colony.

It turns out to be a little more involved than Luffy showing up and making a bad day for the Navy, as two new Oda-designed characters are also taking part. As Luffy tends to do when he lands on an island, he meets a woman who has a problem and gets embroiled in helping her. In this case, she is the leader of the anti-Navy resistance, Jeanne. She must team up with Luffy to take down Isaac, the metal-handed warden of the prison system that is currently taking over her island.

One Piece: World Seeker was recently delayed to 2019 to polish the game up and will be releasing on PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and PC.

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Game Informer News Feed - Wed, 09/19/2018 - 02:20

Bandai Namco has revealed that Raphael, Soulcalibur's resident fencer who went from protagonist to antagonist over the course of the series. Thanks to the magic of time travel and also, like, regular magic, Raphael can turn back the clock on becoming a vampire and instead just be a weird guy in a carnival of way weirder guys.

Raphael was leaked a few weeks ago through unofficial footage of a build that showed both him and Cervantes, both of whom have now been announced. If Bandai Namco were waiting to announce Cassandra, which clearly they must be, then now is a good time when we're all caught off-guard. 

Soulcalibur VI is releasing on PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and PC on October 19.

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Game Informer News Feed - Tue, 09/18/2018 - 23:05

Late last night, Tri-Ace announced that their PlayStation 3 and Xbox 360 RPG Resonance of Fate will be getting a 4K/HD Edition for PlayStation 4 and PC.

The sci-fi fantasy RPG was first released in 2010 and caught a lot of attention with its flashy and strategic combat. The game was originally published by Sega, but the company confirmed to us that they licensed the title to Tri-Ace for the HD remaster.

The 4K part of the title refers to the PC and PlayStation 4 Pro enhancements, while the base model will run the game at 1080p. All versions will run at 60 frames per second.

Resonance of Fate 4K/HD Edition will release worldwide on October 18 for $35.

Categories: Games

The Last Remnant Remastered Comparison Trailer Pits New Vs. Old

Game Informer News Feed - Tue, 09/18/2018 - 20:20

Square Enix revealed last week that The Last Remnant, a 360 and PC RPG released toward the beginning of the previous generation as one of the first major Japanese games on Unreal Engine 3, would be getting an HD remaster on PlayStation 4. As part of the remaster, the game was getting rebuilt from the ground up for Unreal Engine 4, which has not always worked out for remastered games. To illustrate the difference for this, though, Square Enix provided a comparison video of the original Xbox 360 release and the new PlayStation 4 one.

The remaster has higher resolution textures, a more modern lighting model, and framerate improvements. While the original game on Xbox 360 ran poorly, the PC version ran quite a bit better, and had been considered the definitive version of the game. Unfortunately, Square Enix delisted the game on PC shortly before announcing the remaster, but has provided no information on whether the remastered version will replace the delisted one. We have reached out to Square Enix on the subject multiple times but received no response.

The Last Remnant Remastered releases on PlayStation 4 worldwide on December 6.

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Game Informer News Feed - Tue, 09/18/2018 - 19:55

A few weeks ago, Witcher developers CDProjekt Red announced that they were separating Gwent's single-player campaign out from the card game's client as a standalone release titled Thronebreaker. Since details were so scarce, not many expected that the excision would be quite so prompt, with CDPR confirming an October 24 release date for PC and a console release on December 4.

Thronebreaker was developed to be the single-player campaign for Gwent, itself spun-off from the side activity in the Witcher III: The Wild Hunt. According to CDPR, the campaign got too big to simply be a side thing for Gwent and is being released with "The Witcher Tales" as a subtitle. It is unclear if this means a new brand categorization that allows for further spin-offs within the Witcher universe.

Gwent itself is coming out of beta on October 23 on PC, one day ahead of Thronebreaker, and the same day as Thronebreaker on consoles. 

When asked on Twitter if Thronebreaker would feature a cameo from Geralt, CDPR merely posted a gif of the white-haired warrior and left it at that.

Categories: Games

New Kingdom Hearts III Extended Trailer Shows More Of Big Hero 6

Game Informer News Feed - Tue, 09/18/2018 - 06:50

Last week, Square Enix released the shortened version of their latest Kingdom Hearts III trailer showing Big Hero 6, which had been announced years prior with a small piece of concept art. Now, Square Enix and Tetsuya Nomura have released an extended version of that trailer with two minutes of new content over the last trailer.

As this is a TGS trailer, it's obviously in Japanese but Square Enix helpfully added English subtitles to the trailer for international Kingdom Hearts fans. Square Enix also released the box art for the game, which shows all the major players for this final piece of the series.

Kingdom Hearts III releases on January 29 on PlayStation 4 and Xbox One.

Categories: Games

Wasteland 2: Director's Cut Nintendo Switch Review

Gamespot News Feed - Tue, 09/18/2018 - 01:27

One of the most beautiful facets of Wasteland 2 is its wistful, austere writing. Taking lots of inspiration from tabletop RPGs, Wasteland 2 masterfully brings the best bits of open-ended roleplaying games to the digital realm, bringing the genre's hallmark nuanced scenarios, deep roleplaying, and rich, atmospheric description along. Several years after its release, it's coming to Switch, and even now it's among the best in the recent roleplaying crop.

The Director's Cut, an updated release that was a free upgrade for most console players, is the edition getting the Switch treatment. There are thousands of lines of added spoken dialogue, but the text still does most of the heavy lifting. The bigger additions are the smoother graphical presentation as well as having more minutiae with which to customize your characters. Perks and Quirks, for instance, give you the option to swap a boon for some persistent disadvantage. While that sounds counterintuitive in a video game, it pays dividends in the actual role-playing: It gives you the ability to further refine your squad and encourage yourself to think a bit outside the box as you work around the traits. For some, that might be a turn-off, but Wasteland 2 embraces it.

You are, from the start, invited to craft your own troop of folks with whom you will travel the wastes. You can (and probably should) come up with your own backstories and use those to build out your squad. You don't have to, of course, but having a written paragraph or two, as well as hand-crafted motivations, Wasteland suggests, will help tie you to the world and your team of avatars. And damned if it isn't dead-on. While Wasteland 2 definitely offers up a decent chunk of narrative assistance for those who want to keep things simple, this is an adventure that pleads for you to give your all and is willing to reward the effort.

As you might suspect, your squad's goal is to survive in a post-apocalyptic wasteland. And, as is so often the case, it's obvious that the end of civilization came in the nuclear flavor. Soon after the opening, your crew joins up with the Desert Rangers, one of the only semblances of civilization that has emerged from the chaos.

Your group struggles alongside the people you encounter, and you can be assured that their lives are exactly as dour as they seem. By giving the people you encounter such depth--which, admittedly, still can often descend into cartoonishly exaggerated moral extremes--it can be a genuine struggle to be cruel. Still, kindness isn't the panacea you'd perhaps hope.

One moment stood out to me when I first played Wasteland 2, and it's just as haunting today. As I wrote in my original review: "One particularly tough scene had me slowly watching a woman die as she begged my squad to put her out of her misery. Trying to show an ounce of mercy in an otherwise cold and macabre place, I agreed. A child saw me and ran to tell his family--another group I had agreed to help by finding their stolen pigs. They were terrified of me, and left their home without food and water. They probably died."

Those consequences are made all the richer by your investment and your choice to engage with what the game has to offer. There is an unusually broad number of solutions to just about any problem, and it's often better to examine as many possible angles as you can before acting. Still, there's an anarchic resignation that underpins everything. No matter how you act, you'll often cause collateral damage. That posits a rather severe world, but then again, this is a hypothetical where people really did poison the planet and vaporize one another.

The fuzziness of it all tests your characters, too. And they can (and should) be rewritten as you go. Wasteland 2 doesn't just hit you with these conditions to wear you down, but to see how your characters respond. This is trying, it is exhausting emotionally for your crew. How do they handle that? Will their spark of optimism be ground away by the relentless struggle, or will it live on? More importantly, why?

The breadth of options to approach any given scenario or various other challenges is vital to backing that up. While the game has been touted as one where you can kill absolutely everyone, that really isn't wise and is a self-indulgent waste. In much the same way, it is possible, however unlikely, to make it through just about all of the game without killing people. That's less exciting for many, but it highlights the real point. The array of choices you can make are a means to an end--how would your character respond to this grim world?

To that end, combat is also remarkably diverse. In much the same way that your team can flex to meet the needs you encounter, combat, too has a lot of different ways to approach problems. At its most basic, when you shift into fights, you'll be arranged into a turn order and you proceed maneuvering through the area until all hostiles have been dealt with. Non-lethal options exist, but many of your foes are mutants, robots, and other rough-and-tumble, battle-hardened mercenaries. Maintaining control of the field against enemies willing to pull out high-yield explosives is a challenge, to say the least.

But that also hints at the relevant outcomes from the fight. Wasteland 2 is an RPG first, and your battles will have narrative consequences. As a result, your goals are often a little more refined than "blow it all up." And those going that route will be hard-pressed to care for the members of their team, who are just as vulnerable to the searing hot shrapnel from a stray grenade as your target is--so what you have is an array of options that are constrained by practical considerations.

Wasteland 2 seamlessly translates the myriad diplomatic and social options into a wide set of combat styles and approaches.

How much collateral damage are you okay accepting? How much risk are you willing to accept? When your crew starts bleeding out, will you run a medic over to patch them up, putting both at risk, or press the offensive? These options also have their own contexts within the narrative. How you use your party's skills to address puzzles and challenges in the main arc will have a big effect on if and when someone comes after waggling their creaky, rusted rifles.

Wasteland 2 seamlessly translates the myriad diplomatic and social options into a wide set of combat styles and approaches. Once again, more investment in the weapons your team carries and uses yields dividends. Having a few different types of weapons and the ability to support each, as well as an understanding of how to use them, allows your group to tackle just about any problem--regardless of whether they marched into or couldn't talk their way out of it.

In fact, the only substantive complaints are longer-than-comfortable loading times and the lack of extensive touchscreen support for the Switch edition. Given that much of the combat is tactical, and that a touchscreen works as a damned fine substitute for a mouse, the feature is an apparent omission that prevents the Switch version from being the best yet.

Wasteland 2 is still a very special outing. If you haven't spent your time in this irradiated desert just yet, this is one of the best times to do so--especially since the portability of the Switch reissue lets you take the journey on long treks of your own, or as a dense RPG to curl and nestle in with, as you might with an excellent book. On such a screen, the interpersonal dramas feel a bit more intimate, the tension of sneaking your way pay this or that NPC a bit more tangible. Plus, in the Switch's handheld mode, the rather dated-looking visuals aren't so grating. All-told it's a phenomenal port and still one of the better RPGs in recent years.

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Game Informer News Feed - Mon, 09/17/2018 - 18:55

Tetris Effect, the classic puzzle game re-exhilarated by Rez creator Tetsuya Mizuguchi, is coming to the PlayStation 4 in both VR and non-VR forms on November 9, Sony announced today.

We took a look at the game at E3 this year and were somewhat blown away by what this modern version of Tetris had to offer. Tetris Effect combines the tried-and-true formula of Tetris, stretching back thirty years, and combining it with Mizuguchi's trademark sights, sounds, and style represented in games like Rez and Lumines.

The game can be played either with PSVR or without, so there's no need to worry if you don't have the headset or don't feel like getting sucked into the Tetris world. If you have a PS4 Pro, Tetris Effect is 4K and 60 frames per second, as well.

You can get your hands on the game in just a few short months on November 9.

Categories: Games

Rockstar Reveals New Locations, Screens For Red Dead Redemption II

Game Informer News Feed - Mon, 09/17/2018 - 16:13

Rockstar released a slew of new images this morning, highlighting some of the locations players will be able to visit next month when Red Dead Redemption is released. In addition to the picture-postcard shots of each point of interest, the studio released a pair of new screens for each location, showing off some of the game's characters and some of the trouble they can get into.

Take a look at the images in the galleries below, with text straight from Rockstar. Red Dead Redemption II is coming to PlayStation 4 and Xbox One on October 26.

  Annesburg

Life isn’t easy for the miners and their families in Annesburg, which has been providing coal up and down the Lannahechee River for almost a century. Working conditions are terrible for little pay, and many men have lost their lives down the pit

  Lagras

A small, remote settlement out in the swamps of Bayou Nwa, Lemoyne, the people of Lagras live self-sufficiently for the most part, making a little money here and there from fishing and acting as guides for travelers wishing to navigate the region.

  Mount Hagen

One of the more well-known peaks in the snowy Grizzlies of Ambarino, Mount Hagen towers above Lake Isabella to the west and Beartooth Beck to the east, which provides the main pass through the western mountain range and joins up with the Dakota River further south.

  Rhodes

Prim and proper on the surface, tensions and corruption run deep in the Southern town of Rhodes, which for years has been caught in the crossfire between the Braithwaites and the Grays, two warring plantation families.

  Saint Denis

A key gateway into North America with a trade route that runs the length of the country, the bustling city of Saint Denis is a melting pot of cultures and people where businessmen, socialites, sailors, laborers, beggars, and thieves all live side by side.

  Strawberry

Strawberry was little more than a small logging town until the arrival of its new mayor, an East Coast eccentric, who is obsessed with transforming it into a cultural beacon for wealthy tourists, much to the bemusement of the locals.

  Valentine

A raucous, rough-and-tumble town in the Heartlands, Valentine’s livestock auctions attract traders, ranchers, cowboys, gamblers, outlaws, and prostitutes from far and wide, all looking to make some money, raise some hell, and have a good time.

Categories: Games

Surreal Adventure Game The Gardens Between Releases Next Week

Game Informer News Feed - Sun, 09/16/2018 - 21:11

The Gardens Between is an upcoming adventure game about two young best friends, Arina and Frendt, who take a magical journey through different islands where they manipulate time to solve puzzles.

Each island has a surreal feel, with a giant analog television sitting atop a cliff or a popcorn bowl the size of a pond. The Gardens Between features no text or dialogue, relying on its emotive imagery to tell its narrative. The puzzles can be solved by tapping a single button.

The Gardens Between releases very soon, on September 20 for Nintendo Switch, PlayStation 4, and PC.

Categories: Games

Papers, Please Creator's Return Of The Obra Dinn Releasing This Fall

Game Informer News Feed - Sat, 09/15/2018 - 00:40

Return of the Obra Dinn, the newest game from Papers, Please creator Lucas Pope, is a lo-fi first-person title that is the blast from the past in more ways than one. It might be easier to watch the trailer released today than to try and interpret a description of it.

Taking place in Falmouth in 1807, you work as an insurance agent for the East India Company who has been tasked with exploring the ship Obra Dinn. The vessel disappeared years prior, but has suddenly shown up on shore without any of its crew.

The game is scheduled to release this Fall on PC.

Categories: Games

Zone Of The Enders: The 2nd Runner - MARS Review

Gamespot News Feed - Fri, 09/14/2018 - 23:00

Zone of the Enders got a bit of a bum rap as a series overall, being more famous as the game that came with the Metal Gear Solid 2 demo than anything else. Those with the patience, however, would discover one of the most distinct mech games of the day, with more than a heaping dollop of trademark Hideo Kojima madness therein. The 2nd Runner is an improvement on the original in many ways, to be certain, but held against modern standards, Zone of the Enders comes off awful rusty.

There is a story, but it's nigh incomprehensible, even with the caveat that Kojima's fingerprints are all over it. Having prior knowledge of the original doesn't help much either. Basically, two years after the events of the original Zone of the Enders, a miner named Dingo Egret on one of Jupiter's moons finds the frame-mech hero, Jehuty, buried beneath the surface. When the evil army BAHRAM nearly kills Dingo trying to retrieve the armor again, Jehuty is forced by a rebel spy to join with Dingo, keeping him alive using the mech's life support until they complete their mission of blasting the army straight to hell.

Ideally, you'd be able to simply barrel past the story and get to what's good, which is the mech combat, but The 2nd Runner's pacing stutters along. Every stride the game hits is interrupted to deliver more nonsensical ranting on unstoppable power, duty, and the nature of war. Soured even further by English voiceovers that are one step removed from Symphony of the Night-level broad theatrics, the story is a irritating rash all over what should be a fairly straightforward mech combat experience.

Simplicity, really, works in the game's favor. You have a sword, a laser, a rocket-assisted boost, and a shield. Each stage progresses on a fairly linear path, with tiny corridors and loading areas opening up into massive arenas where, for the most part, you're expected to kill everything that moves. Your enemies are generally either flying grunts around Jehuty's own size that go down easy, or swarms of tiny annoyances you can take down en masse by using a special missile barrage. That's generally the gameplay loop, and it only gets more exhilarating the more cannon fodder the game throws at you.

ZOE shows its age most is in its control scheme. It's not necessarily unworkable, but it involves unlearning 15 years of developers figuring out elegant ways of moving around 3D spaces. Two face buttons control elevation, while the dash button is unintuitively set to the shoulders. Despite much of Jehuty's moveset relying on dashing, and fast counter-maneuvers to get in and out of an opponent's space, the motions required to do so feel awkward, even in the new “Pro” configuration that remaps the shoulder buttons and subweapon selects.

The 4K bump in resolution and soundscape enhancements are certainly noticeable, but aside from introducing brand-new textures to the mix, ZOE was always going to wear its PS2 roots rather boldly. Honestly, the game would lose something without that trademark Kojima Productions cinematic judder during intense moments. Instead, Konami went the next step, allowing the entire game to be played in VR. It's a great idea, one that'd be a welcome experiment for a lot of older titles--there's certainly an extra level of immersion, and the aforementioned new soundscape really comes to life in VR, forcing you to use your ears more than your eyes to figure out where enemies and projectiles are coming from.

ZOE shows its age most is in its control scheme.

The control scheme still mucks things up quite a bit, however, and not being able to see your special moves as you use them is a pretty big detriment in busy stages. The game does try to mitigate this, keeping a holographic representation of your avatar as it would be in the regular game on the right-hand side of the cockpit, but taking your eyes off the action is a bad idea, especially during the game's frantic boss fights. Unfortunately, sometimes you have to; bosses have a bad habit of getting up close and personal. In a crowded area, the only thing stopping you from being cornered and slashed to death in three hits is the kind of situational awareness the VR mode doesn't inherently give you. There is a special VR difficulty mode that makes dealing with enemies easier, but it swings the game too far in the other direction towards cakewalk territory.

While Zone of the Enders: The 2nd Runner pushed the envelope when it first launched, it's more admirable for the ways in which it tries to inject depth into a formula that never required it to be successful. There are certainly ambitions to be appreciated, and Konami has at least put some effort into preserving the experience as it was, for better or worse. Still, those ambitions aren’t enough to fight the feeling that it hasn’t been outclassed several times over in the years since.

Categories: Games

Undertale Review - Nintendo Switch Update

Gamespot News Feed - Fri, 09/14/2018 - 18:53

Editor's note: Three years after its initial release on PC, Undertale has found its way to the Nintendo Switch--and of course, the game is every bit as charming, challenging, and harrowing as it was the first time around. Undertale may seem like a straightforward retro-style RPG, but it subverts player expectations every chance it gets, which never gets stale because of clever writing and an evocative chiptune soundtrack. Thankfully, it plays just as well as it does on other platforms without any performance hitches or bugs after putting about hours into this version. Like its console counterparts, you can fill the screen with an adaptive border that thematically fits with the location you're in (Undertale plays in a 4:3 aspect ratio). Dodging enemy attacks in the bullet hell-style defensive phase in combat works just as well with the Joy-Con analog sticks.

Undertale isn't afraid to break convention, and because it does so in a way that's thoughtful and humorous throughout, the result is an emotional rollercoaster that fills us with determination. -- Michael Higham, 14 September 2018 [We have updated the score to reflect our experience with the Nintendo Switch version, in addition to the PC, Mac, and PS4 versions. The original review follows below.]

Undertale's opening cinematic hints at a cliche RPG where you awake in a mysterious world and embark on a journey in hopes of returning to your normal life. Despite the familiar premise, you quickly discover that looks can be deceiving. While many games can take a heavy-handed approach to teaching you the basics, Undertale does so in a way that not only introduces you to the tone of the game, but teaches you not to accept anything at face value. The first character you meet compels you to play nice, but as the cheerful music turns to sinister laughter and your new "friend" declares you an idiot, you get it: expect the unexpected. Undertale makes a name for itself with unusual storytelling techniques and combat mechanics, setting itself apart from the games it seems to imitate. It's also cleverly written and constantly subverts your expectations. There are so many wonderful experiences in store that are tempting to spoil, but to go into too much detail would ruin the element of surprise: one of Undertale's best assets.

While it seems to be a game that's designed for RPG fans first and foremost, a lot of Undertale's jokes have universal appeal. A pair of comically incompetent skeletons regularly spout puns and jokes while attempting--and failing--to halt your progress, and the social ineptitude exhibited by one character when they try to express their feelings for another is a regular source of laughter. With clever characterization and unexpected responses to actions we've been conditioned to view as predictable, Undertale elicits laughter and delight with ease.

You're encouraged to stop and engage with NPCs rather than charge through the story, and you should, because the varied and entertaining cast of monsters reveal valuable information about the wider world. This quality isn't unique, but here, it leads to unusual exchanges that are filled with great quips, simultaneously poking fun at games and human nature alike. The script tip-toes into parody, but an air of earnest thought lifts it above mere mockery. Silly as it can be, Undertale delivers poignant observations that challenge the status-quo.

It's also the sort of experience that encourages you to come back for a second or third round. This is especially true because, over the course of roughly five hours, you make a lot of decisions that impact the world around you. The importance of choice is often felt during combat, which lets you pick between fighting or talking your way out of conflict.

Sometimes the secret to winning is a little bit of love.

Trying to pacify opponents is a far more rewarding experience than simply fighting, and its a process that's unique to each type of enemy. To earn their favor, you have to analyse an enemy's behavior and figure out the right course of action. In one scenario, you can attempt to befriend a violent dog, in another, you might want to cheer up a ghost with low self-esteem; your success will depend on your ability to empathize and react. Navigating social puzzles is a refreshing change of pace for what seems like traditional combat, and the variety of distinct, entertaining enemies you engage with helps stave off a problem that's all-too-common in other RPGs: repetitive random encounters.

Because not all enemies are easily wooed, you eventually need to defend yourself regardless if you intend to fight or not. Undertale handles this with a quirky mechanic that feels out of place at first, but it eventually grows on you because it makes combat engaging and unpredictable in a good way. Enemy attacks appear as waves of projectiles that fly within a square pen, and as they fly by, you have to steer a small heart icon out of their flightpath to avoid taking damage. It's an unusual mechanic, but it's simple to understand and rewarding in the sense that it lets your reflexes-rather than statistics or dice rolls--dictate the outcome of a fight.

The variety of distinct, entertaining enemies you engage with helps stave off a problem that's all-too-common in other RPGs: repetitive random encounters.

Even within combat, Undertale layers on the humor. Sometimes you're dodging bullets, but you also need to watch out for frogs, arms with flexing biceps, and even the tears of a depressed opponent. Linking the shape, size, and behavior of projectiles with enemies' personalities keeps things challenging, and opens the door for even more laughs as you fend off absurd attacks.

Hey, what are friends for?

It would be a crime not to mention Undertale's soundtrack, which is loaded with beautiful bit-based melodies that blend perfectly with the action on-screen. Each boss gets its own theme song, which do a great job of enhancing their particular personality. These tracks in particular bring energy and vigor, putting you on the edge of your seat as you try to fight or befriend your opponent. Outside of battle, tracks set the appropriate mood, too, from the quirky jingle in Temmie Village, to somber melodies that build tension near the end of the game. Regardless of its retro style, Undertale's soundtrack has timeless appeal and is great at evoking emotions.

Without spoiling the many ways it will screw with your expectations, it isn't possible to truly capture how wonderful Undertale is. You wouldn't know it with a passing glance, but it's one of the most progressive and innovative RPGs to come in a long time, breaking down tradition for the sake of invention, with great success.

Categories: Games

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Game Informer News Feed - Fri, 09/14/2018 - 16:55

Bandai Namco revealed a new fighter for Jump Force this morning and it's a fella' who is known more for throwing cards than throwing fists.

Summon your most powerful card because Yugi is coming to #JUMPFORCE! Ready to duel against the King of Games? Tell us in comments which mighty card would you summon to battle?

Unite to fight, JUMP FORCE arrives in 2019! Pre-order your copy here: https://t.co/tpmTsXlGz5 pic.twitter.com/m91bqQFsan

— Bandai Namco US (@BandaiNamcoUS) September 14, 2018

Reading into Bandai Namco's tweet announcement, it sounds like Yugi will be fighting by summoning the monsters found on his assorted cards, rather then getting into the fray himself. It will likely be a Pokémon Trainer from Smash Bros. situation.

Jump Force is coming to PS4 and Xbox One next year.

[Source: @BandaiNamcoUS]

Categories: Games

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